Onions

 

Storage


Onions should be stored in a well ventilated space at room temperature, away from heat and bright light. With the exception of green onions, do not refrigerate onions. Place them in a wire hanging basket or a perforated bowl with a raised base so that air can circulate underneath. The length of storage varies with the type of onion. Those that are more pungent in flavor, such as yellow onions, should keep for about a month if stored properly. They will keep longer than those with a sweeter taste, such as white onions, since the compounds that confer their sharp taste help to preserve them. Scallions should be stored in a plastic bag in the refrigerator where they will keep for about one week. All onions should be stored away from potatoes, as they will absorb their moisture and ethylene gas, causing them to spoil more readily.

Nutrition

Onions, like garlic, are members of the Allium family, and both are rich in sulphur-containing compounds that are responsible for their pungent odours and for many of their health-promoting effects. Studies have shown that these compounds have anti-mutagenic (protects from cancers) and anti-diabetic properties (helps lower blood sugar levels in diabetics).

Varieties we grow:

Sierra Balnca

Redwing

Deep Purple

NY Early

Red Bull





History

Onions are native to Asia and the Middle East and have been cultivated for over five thousand years. Onions were highly regarded by the Egyptians. Not only did they use them as currency to pay the workers who built the pyramids, but they also placed them in the tombs of kings, such as Tutankhamen, so that they could carry these gifts bestowed with spiritual significance with them to the afterlife.

Onions have been revered throughout time not only for their culinary use, but also for their therapeutic properties. As early as the 6th century, onions were used as a medicine in India. While they were popular with the ancient Greeks and Romans, they were oftentimes dressed with extra seasonings since many people did not find them spicy enough. Yet, it was their pungency that made onions popular among poor people throughout the world who could freely use this inexpensive vegetable to spark up their meals. Onions were an indispensable vegetable in the cuisines of many European countries during the Middle Ages and later even served as a classic healthy breakfast food. Christopher Columbus brought onions to the West Indies; their cultivation spread from there throughout the Western Hemisphere. Today China, India, the United States, Russian, and Spain are among the leading producers of onions.

Recipes

Simple Serving Ideas

  1. Combine chopped onions, tomatoes, avocado, and jalapeno for an all-in-one guacamole salsa dip.

  2. To perk up plain rice, top with green onions (scallions) and sesame seeds.

  3. Healthy sauteed chopped onions can enhance the flavour or almost any vegetable dish.

  4. Enjoy a classic Italian salad--sliced onions, tomatoes, and mozzarella cheese drizzled with olive oil.


French Onion Soup

40 Onion Recipes